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What can grandchildren learn from their Jewish grandparents?

As it turn out, a lot! Judaism not only takes place in the day school or synagogue. Judaism “happens” during family time at a Shabbat dinner, in the magic of Hanukkah candles or in the smell of freshly-baked hamentaschen. By dropping a coin in the tzedakah box or paying a visit to a sick friend -- Jewish grandparents help shape Jewish identities and Jewish memories of their grandchildren. Identities and memories that your grandchildren will likely pass onto their children. There are many ways that grandparents can create Jewish experiences for their grandchildren. One does not have to be a Jewish scholar to transmit the true meaning of Judaism as a way of life. But doing things together can. Grandparents...

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What is Yiddish?

Yiddish was at one time the international language of Ashkenazic Jews from Central and Eastern Europe and their descendants. A hybrid of Hebrew and medieval German, Yiddish takes about three-quarters of its vocabulary from German, but borrows word liberally from Hebrew and many other languages from the many lands where Ashkenazic Jews have lived. It is generally believed that Yiddish became a language of its own some time between 900 and 100 C.E. Yiddish was primarily a spoken language rather than a written language. It has a grammatical structure all its own and is written in an alphabet based on Hebrew characters. Scholars and universities have classified Yiddish as a Germanic language. Yiddish was never part of Sephardic Jewish culture...

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